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5 Tips on Introducing a Friend to the Mountain Bike Trails

Posted on June 27, 2018 @ 5:13 PM

We’re fascinated by how people get in to mountain biking. To those on the outside, it’s a sport for people who are indifferent to collarbone breaks, terrifying heights and bikes worth more than their cars.

Obviously there is some truth to that, but there’s also so much more. We’ve put together 5 tips on how to get your friends into this amazing sport. 


1. Start Small

"You mean we're going up THERE?!"

Picture it: You’ve finally convinced your friend to meet you at the trailhead. Rostrevor Mountain Bike Trails are your local, so it’s obvious to meet there – right? They get out of the car, look up – and lo and behold, there is Slievemeen starting them in the face. Even the most hardcore mountain biker will be daunted by that sight, let alone a newbie.

Start small and take them to somewhere with plenty of green and blue trail. The likes of Blessingbourne Estate and even Castlewellan Mountain Bike Trails are ideal for that. Leave the red trails for the next session unless they are really taking to it.

In addition to introducing them to the trails themselves, do the fun stuff. Send them a link to learn the mountain biking lingo. Both Blessingbourne Estate and Castlewellan have pump tracks, so have a bit of fun trying to get them going as far as possible without pedalling.

 

2. Speak to your trailhead provider

All of the trailhead providers love to see mountain bikers cross their door.

There’s a wealth of information out there for beginners that most mountain bikers never have to consider. What height should the seat be? What’s the procedure if you hurt yourselves on the trails? In addition, the trailhead provider is your best bet if your friend doesn’t have a mountain bike themselves.

Trailhead providers for:

Davagh Forest Mountain Bike Trails – Outdoor Concepts

Rostrevor Mountain Bike Trails – East Coast Adventure

Castlewellan Mountain Bike Trails – Life Adventure Centre

Outdoor Concepts also do bike hire for Barnett Demesne along with Mobile Team Adventure, and the Lowry’s at Blessingbourne Estate do bike hire and will be more than happy to provide you with advice on their trails.

 

3. Ride ahead (at the start)

Pedals level, seat up, lean into it... You know the drill!

You’ve picked your trails, sorted a bike and all the other bits and pieces you’ll need for the day – now it’s time to actually get moving. At the start, it’s probably best for you to keep ahead of your friend on the trails. They’ll be able to see the lines you choose (presuming you choose the easier ones for their first time) and follow.

Equally, you can shout back to warn them about any particularly gnarly bits. It also has the advantage of keeping their eyes up on you and how you’re riding, rather than staring down at whatever is immediately over them.

Once their confidence is up – and maybe when you’re on a fairly level bit of trail – feel free to fall behind and help coach their technique.

 

4. Stop for a breather

Pit stops are a must when spending hours cycling the trails

The mountain bike trails around Northern Ireland provide some spectacular views, which is just as an important element of mountain biking, if not more so, than the exercise. Most people new to mountain biking will feel the burn in their legs a lot earlier than you will, and might not want to let it show.

Stop as you go around and chat to them about whatever section of trail you’re on. Chat to other riders. Lift some litter.

If your friend is struggling badly, it’s possibly a good idea to recommend they try out an e-bike – particularly for the climbs.

 

5. Fall Off

A  mountain biker crashed out in the Red Bull Foxhunt 2017.

As much as we’d like to say this never happens, if you’re on a bike – it’s going to. And that’s part of the fun. While mountain bikers certainly don’t relish coming off, a small tumble here and there adds to a great recounting of a day on the bikes and generally provides a healthy respect for the trails and your bike.

Remind your friend that they will come off, and that’s okay – just keep the helmet on, the pace steady and the GoPro rolling.

 

All in all, mountain biking’s hardcore image shouldn’t put people off an incredible sport. The rider who does XC every other day is very different from the DH fans. There are loads of different levels of interest and technique and with a friend like you, they’ll get into it in no time.

Ethan Loughrey
Ethan Loughrey  Mountain Bike Officer

Hardest thing about Mountain Biking? Definitely the trees.

Read more and/or leave comments at the official Northern Ireland Outdoor Adventure Blog >

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